Waste Removal in London by Train

By September 14, 2020Uncategorized

With high recycling targets being set by the government one option that offers a cost-effective way to transport rubbish to landfill or recycling plants is by train. It’s a safe, environmentally friendly option and can transport significantly larger volumes of trash than by road at a lower cost and less impact to the environment per tonne of waste.

Just how cost-effective it is depends, of course, on the distance the loads are being transported but clearly very short distances of less than 20 miles are unlikely to be cost-effective. But with major recycling plants few and far between the chances are that waste will be transported long distances to take advantage of high tech recycling facilities. What also contributes to rail as a cost-effective waste transportation option is that there are few seasonal fluctuations in waste production and fewer delays likely with freight trains than by road.

 
Waste Removal by Train

Waste Removal in London

London produces 4 million tonnes of waste each year and waste from west London, at least, has been transported out of the capital by rail for decades via Brentford in secure, enclosed containers. East London also now has a waste removal service via train and a nightly service can eliminate over 100 lorries from the congested roads in and around London. Nearly double that number of lorries is removed from our roads by the train transportation of waste from North London

Whilst less waste is now going to landfill because of government targets to increase recycling the waste still has to be transported to the treatment facilities that use the new technology to handle the waste in an environmentally way so the transport issue is essential to effective recycling.

However, if rail freight is to be part of the future of waste and recycling transportation then several new terminals will be required and there are limited sites in London that could be used for this purpose.

 

Featured Image Courtesy of B4bees at Flickr